A View from the Bridge

Paperback
$15.00 US
5.08"W x 7.73"H x 0.28"D  
On sale Jul 28, 1977 | 96 Pages | 978-0-14-048135-8
| Grades 9-12 + AP/IB
America's greatest playwright weaves "a vivid, crackling, idiomatic psychosexual horror tale." —Frank Rich, The New York Times

Winner of the 2016 Tony Awards for Best Revival of a Play and Best Direction of a Play: Ivo van Hove.

In A View from the Bridge Arthur Miller explores the intersection between one man's self-delusion and the brutal trajectory of fate. Eddie Carbone is a Brooklyn longshoreman, a hard-working man whose life has been soothingly predictable. He hasn't counted on the arrival of two of his wife's relatives, illegal immigrants from Italy; nor has he recognized his true feelings for his beautiful niece, Catherine. And in due course, what Eddie doesn't know—about her, about life, about his own heart—will have devastating consequences. 

"The play has moments of intense power. . . . Miller plays on the audience with the skill of a master." —Clive Barnes, New York Post

© Arthur Miller, 1995. © Inge Morath / Magnum Photos.
Arthur Miller (1915–2005) was born in New York City and studied at the University of Michigan. His plays include All My Sons (1947), Death of a Salesman (1949), The Crucible (1953), A View from the Bridge, A Memory of Two Mondays (1955), After the Fall (1963), Incident at Vichy (1964), The Price (1968), The Creation of the World and Other Business (1972) and The American Clock (1980). He also wrote two novels, Focus (1945) and The Misfits, which was filmed in 1960, and the text for In Russia (1969), Chinese Encounters (1979), and In the Country (1977), three books of photographs by his wife, Inge Morath. His later work included a memoir, Timebends (1987); the plays The Ride Down Mt. Morgan (1991), The Last Yankee (1993), Broken Glass (1994), and Mr. Peter's Connections (1999); Echoes Down the Corridor: Collected Essays, 1944–2000; and On Politics and the Art of Acting (2001). He twice won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award, and in 1949 he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. Miller was the recipient of the National Book Foundation’s 2001 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, the Prince of Asturias Award for Letters in 2002, and the Jerusalem Prize in 2003. View titles by Arthur Miller

Educator Guide for A View from the Bridge

Classroom-based guides appropriate for schools and colleges provide pre-reading and classroom activities, discussion questions connected to the curriculum, further reading, and resources.

(Please note: the guide displayed here is the most recently uploaded version; while unlikely, any page citation discrepancies between the guide and book is likely due to pagination differences between a book’s different formats.)

Winner of the National Book Award Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters

"[In Arthur Miller's plays] we find the true compassion and catharsis that are as essential to our society as water and fire and babies and air. . . . Miller awakened in me the taste for all that must be-the empathy and love for the least of us, out of which bursts a gratitude for the poetry of his characters and the greatness of their creator."
-Philip Seymour Hoffman, from the Foreword

About

America's greatest playwright weaves "a vivid, crackling, idiomatic psychosexual horror tale." —Frank Rich, The New York Times

Winner of the 2016 Tony Awards for Best Revival of a Play and Best Direction of a Play: Ivo van Hove.

In A View from the Bridge Arthur Miller explores the intersection between one man's self-delusion and the brutal trajectory of fate. Eddie Carbone is a Brooklyn longshoreman, a hard-working man whose life has been soothingly predictable. He hasn't counted on the arrival of two of his wife's relatives, illegal immigrants from Italy; nor has he recognized his true feelings for his beautiful niece, Catherine. And in due course, what Eddie doesn't know—about her, about life, about his own heart—will have devastating consequences. 

"The play has moments of intense power. . . . Miller plays on the audience with the skill of a master." —Clive Barnes, New York Post

Author

© Arthur Miller, 1995. © Inge Morath / Magnum Photos.
Arthur Miller (1915–2005) was born in New York City and studied at the University of Michigan. His plays include All My Sons (1947), Death of a Salesman (1949), The Crucible (1953), A View from the Bridge, A Memory of Two Mondays (1955), After the Fall (1963), Incident at Vichy (1964), The Price (1968), The Creation of the World and Other Business (1972) and The American Clock (1980). He also wrote two novels, Focus (1945) and The Misfits, which was filmed in 1960, and the text for In Russia (1969), Chinese Encounters (1979), and In the Country (1977), three books of photographs by his wife, Inge Morath. His later work included a memoir, Timebends (1987); the plays The Ride Down Mt. Morgan (1991), The Last Yankee (1993), Broken Glass (1994), and Mr. Peter's Connections (1999); Echoes Down the Corridor: Collected Essays, 1944–2000; and On Politics and the Art of Acting (2001). He twice won the New York Drama Critics Circle Award, and in 1949 he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. Miller was the recipient of the National Book Foundation’s 2001 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, the Prince of Asturias Award for Letters in 2002, and the Jerusalem Prize in 2003. View titles by Arthur Miller

Guides

Educator Guide for A View from the Bridge

Classroom-based guides appropriate for schools and colleges provide pre-reading and classroom activities, discussion questions connected to the curriculum, further reading, and resources.

(Please note: the guide displayed here is the most recently uploaded version; while unlikely, any page citation discrepancies between the guide and book is likely due to pagination differences between a book’s different formats.)

Praise

Winner of the National Book Award Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters

"[In Arthur Miller's plays] we find the true compassion and catharsis that are as essential to our society as water and fire and babies and air. . . . Miller awakened in me the taste for all that must be-the empathy and love for the least of us, out of which bursts a gratitude for the poetry of his characters and the greatness of their creator."
-Philip Seymour Hoffman, from the Foreword

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