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Legendary Children

The First Decade of RuPaul's Drag Race and the Last Century of Queer Life

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A definitive deep-dive into queer history and culture with hit reality show RuPaul's Drag Race as a touchstone, by the creators of the pop culture blog Tom and Lorenzo

NPR's Best Books of the Year 2020 pick
A New York Times New & Noteworthy book
One of Logo/NewNowNext's "11 Queer Books We Can't Wait to Read This Spring"


From the singular voices behind Tom and Lorenzo comes the ultimate guide to all-things RuPaul's Drag Race and its influence on modern LGBTQ culture. Legendary Children centers itself around the idea that not only is RuPaul's Drag Race the queerest show in the history of television, but that RuPaul and company devised a show that serves as an actual museum of queer cultural and social history, drawing on queer traditions and the work of legendary figures going back nearly a century. In doing so, Drag Race became not only a repository of queer history and culture, but also an examination and illustration of queer life in the modern age. It is a snapshot of how LGBTQ folks live, struggle, work, and reach out to one another--and how they always have--and every bit of it is tied directly to Drag Race. Each chapter is an examination of a specific aspect of the show--the Werk Room, the Library, the Pit Crew, the runway, the Untucked lounge, the Snatch Game--that ties to a specific aspect of queer cultural history and/or the work of certain legendary figures in queer cultural history.
The bloggers behind the massively popular site Tom and Lorenzo, Tom Fitzgerald and Lorenzo Marquez offer their unique take on all things fashion and pop culture-related every day to an audience of more than seven million readers a month. They've appeared three times on Sundance Channel's All on the Line, with Joe Zee, in which Joe called them "two of the most important fashion bloggers today," made a dozen-plus appearances on Sirius XM Radio's "The Derek & Romaine Show," and have been profiled, quoted or interviewed by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, National Public Radio, Entertainment Weekly, People, Vanity Fair, Elle, Rolling Stone, the Daily Telegraph, The Huffington Post, Slate, The Guardian, and Newsweek, among others. They live in Philadelphia.

Introduction

This book is meant to be read one-handed.

No, you didn’t accidentally pick up the wrong book or get a defective copy with the wrong cover on

it. What we mean is that this book was devised, from its inception, to spur the reader on to look up more about the people highlighted and spotlighted in it. We want you to become so curious about what Julian Eltinge looked like or how Charles Pierce sounded or whether we’re doing Tandi Iman Dupree jus- tice when we describe her legendary lip sync that you can’t help but want to see it for yourself. We want you to grab your phone and look up a video or blog post or wiki entry about any of the people or events mentioned in this book whenever the curiosity strikes you. There is an Alexandria-size library of spectacular queer history and cultural essays literally at your fingertips, and this book was written not only with that in mind but in a way that encourages you to look someone up because you read about them in these pages. Practically every performer mentioned in this book has some aspect of their work preserved online, which means you can look up Jackie Shane singing “Walking the Dog” on Canadian television in 1965 or Sylvia Rivera’s legendary speech at the Christopher Street parade in 1973 as easily as you can look up Manila Luzon’s latest music video.

RuPaul’s Drag Race started out as the purest representation of gay male social culture that television had ever seen, and eventually morphed into a celebration of LGBTQ life and culture in general, encompassing all the work and lives of count- less queer people who came before it. Every aspect and feature of the show can be traced to some long-standing tradition, event, or practice in queer life, queer communities, and queer culture. RuPaul and company devised a show that serves as an actual museum of queer cultural and social history, drawing on queer traditions and the work of legendary figures going back nearly a century. In doing so, Drag Race became not only a repository of queer history and culture but an examination and illustration of queer life in the modern age. It is a series of snap- shots illustrating how LGBTQ folks live, struggle, work, and reach out to each other—and how they always have.

The point of this book isn’t to reveal all the secrets and hidden meanings behind Drag Race—the show isn’t that deliberate in its intentions; and besides, that’s not how culture works. The point is to show that Drag Race exists smack on the continuum of queer culture and history and naturally pulls references from up and down its timeline, sometimes deliberately and sometimes as a result of a cultural osmosis.

The history of the show itself is something of a queer Cinderella story, a nearly perfect metaphor for drag: A dirty little smeared-lens, poorly lit, low-def, rough-looking drag revue sandwiched between HIV meds and leather gear ads on an extremely niche cable network went on to become a worldwide glamour extravaganza. The journey of the show perfectly mimics the journey of drag as an underground form of expression that eventually found its way to the highest arenas of media and entertainment. The first season of Drag Race looks like it was shot in the dimly lit back room of a bar somewhere, but by the tenth season, it looked exactly like what it was at that point: a massive hit variety show loaded with sparkle and glamour, populated by impossibly beautiful beings with sickeningly flawless makeup. We’re going to show how queer culture generally and drag culture specifically made a very similar journey. When we say “queer culture,” that’s not necessarily the same thing as queer equality or legal protections, nor does it encompass the broad spectrum of queer existence. It’s the shared culture created or curated by queer people for queer people arising out of our experiences as queer people.

The story of RuPaul’s Drag Race is the same as the story of the LGBTQ political and cultural movement of the past half century; it’s impossible to separate one from the other. You can’t talk about RuPaul’s Drag Race in any depth without talking a bit about the history of drag as a form of expression and a part of pop culture. And you can’t talk about drag as a form of expression without talking about its place in queer life. And you can’t talk about queer life over time without having some idea of what LGBTQ folks faced in the past and how their lives played out.

For the majority of the twentieth century, it was illegal for a man to appear in public wearing women’s clothing. It was illegal for men to have sex with other men, and the mere act of flirting could land a man in jail or a mental institution, or have him medicated against his will (a practice known as “chemical castration”). It was illegal to produce or distribute any work that depicted same-sex desires, and it was illegal for bars and restaurants to serve alcohol to gay or lesbian patrons. Same-sex desire and gender nonconformity were considered mental illnesses by the American Psychiatric Association and the majority of the medical community. It’s important to know these things in order to understand just how brave and fuck-you fierce our queer forebears actually were. They didn’t just declare them- selves in the face of societal disapproval; they did so in the face of attempted social genocide. And they just kept on going, surviving and then thriving, creating art, communities, and families— and redefining all three in the process. These people were criminals and outlaws, punks and badass bitches. Maybe they didn’t always feel like it at the time, but they were revolutionaries. More important, they won the revolution. It just took some time for everyone else to notice.

But we would never want to claim that those queens and queers of the past lived lives of misery or tragedy. We think a good deal of our LGBTQ forebears would have summed up their lives as ones filled to the brim with a kind of ragingly defiant beauty—gorgeous weeds breaking fabulously through the cracks in the pavement. We choose to see them that way because we feel it pays tribute to their struggles without depicting them as tragic. They were too beautiful, too strong, too brave for us to see them any other way. We hope we’ve done them justice, and we hope you see them the same way by the time you’ve read all their stories. They were, every one of them, without question, legends.

Now, put your face on. We’ve got a show to do.

“As a longtime, devoted reader and admirer of Tom and Lorenzo's writing, I couldn't be more thrilled to have such a detailed, comprehensive analysis of the best reality television show ever made on Planet Earth (RuPaul's Drag Race). I adore Legendary Children, not just because I am in it, but for its thoroughly entertaining catalogue of television, drag and queer history.”
—Katya Zamolodchikova, co-author of Trixie and Katya’s Guide to Modern Womanhood

“Using Drag Race's prominence as a mirror to reflect drag brilliance through the ages, this must-read book articulately celebrates the icons—both well-known and under-appreciated—who made magic with a mascara wand and whose finely glossed lips were always worth reading. Like this book!”
—Michael Musto 

“Informative, entertaining, melodramatic in its obsessiveness, and written with equal amounts of insight and wit, the book serves as a commemorative archive of drag in American life.”
Kirkus

“It's officially been a decade since RuPaul's Drag Race aired its first season, and a groundbreaking queer phenomenon was born. In celebration of this milestone, Tom Fitzgerald and Lorenzo Marquez wrote Legendary Children, which explores queer history and culture and talks about how RuPaul's hit reality show contributed to this rich tradition.”
Cosmopolitan

“Part loving homage to the show, part history lesson, think of it as the queer education you didn't get in public school.”
Evan Ross Katz, Paper

Legendary Children arrives at just the right time — both because season 12 of 'Drag Race' just premiered and because the world needs authenticity in its stories. Fitzgerald and Marquez deliver that, giving readers an insight into the important but overlooked people who made our current moment possible.”
—Ryan Carey-Mahoney, The Washington Post

“[Legendary Children] turn[s] ‘Drag Race’s’ challenges and recurring elements (the Pit Crew, Snatch Game, etc.) into a deceptively simple framing device for a nuanced exploration of the gender-bending figures, insider lingo and significant milestones in queer history to which the show owes its existence…For a book about reality television, Legendary Children is unusually ambitious — an obsessively detailed portrait of modern LGBTQ life and how it came to be.”
—Katie Wudel, The Los Angeles Times


“It’s a delightful and important look at the way past queens and other queer folk have shaped not only drag but also queer life as we know it. Fitzgerald and Marquez have crafted a world in which drag queens are heroes - fighting for equality and looking fierce and fabulous while doing it. It’s a history well told, one that is approachable and enjoyable for all to digest. The prose is upbeat and makes a reader as excited about the history as the authors so clearly are.”
—Molly Sprayregen, Associated Press

“The sharp, smart playfulness…encapsulates the tremendous appeal of Legendary Children: great seriousness of purpose set off by a mischievous, even lascivious wink. Using Drag Race as a framework to explore many, many corners of LGBTQ+ life is something of a stroke of genius, making this an excellent piece of TV criticism as well as an exploration of history.”
—Allison Shoemaker, AV Club

“The book seamlessly weaves LGBTQ history into the 'Drag Race' present, and gives readers a deep dive into the background of the show’s challenges, and what they mean in the history of queer life.”
—Carole Horst, Variety

RuPaul’s Drag Race fans will salivate over this definitive deep-dive and ultimate guide to all-things Drag Race and how the hit show has influenced modern LGBTQ culture.”
—Queerty

“Legendary bloggers Tom and Lorenzo trace the last century of queer revolutionary activity through the art of drag. The history of acceptance of queer people has waxed and waned, and they guide us through the big cultural moments that allowed greater visibility and took rights away at the same time.”
—Julia Rittenberg,
Book Riot

“This book cleverly weaves aspects of RuPaul’s Drag Race – lip syncing, the Snatch Game, serving lewks – with the queer cultural history behind the show. In the introduction, Tom Fitzgerald and Lorenzo Marquez style bloggers Tom + Lorenzo, encourage readers to Google as they go, diving into Internet rabbit holes on various aspects of queer culture outlined in the book. Reading this book led me to discover a treasure trove of YouTube videos, documentaries and Wikipedia pages that I never would have found on my own.”
Jessica Reedy, producer, Pop Culture Happy Hour

About

A definitive deep-dive into queer history and culture with hit reality show RuPaul's Drag Race as a touchstone, by the creators of the pop culture blog Tom and Lorenzo

NPR's Best Books of the Year 2020 pick
A New York Times New & Noteworthy book
One of Logo/NewNowNext's "11 Queer Books We Can't Wait to Read This Spring"


From the singular voices behind Tom and Lorenzo comes the ultimate guide to all-things RuPaul's Drag Race and its influence on modern LGBTQ culture. Legendary Children centers itself around the idea that not only is RuPaul's Drag Race the queerest show in the history of television, but that RuPaul and company devised a show that serves as an actual museum of queer cultural and social history, drawing on queer traditions and the work of legendary figures going back nearly a century. In doing so, Drag Race became not only a repository of queer history and culture, but also an examination and illustration of queer life in the modern age. It is a snapshot of how LGBTQ folks live, struggle, work, and reach out to one another--and how they always have--and every bit of it is tied directly to Drag Race. Each chapter is an examination of a specific aspect of the show--the Werk Room, the Library, the Pit Crew, the runway, the Untucked lounge, the Snatch Game--that ties to a specific aspect of queer cultural history and/or the work of certain legendary figures in queer cultural history.

Author

The bloggers behind the massively popular site Tom and Lorenzo, Tom Fitzgerald and Lorenzo Marquez offer their unique take on all things fashion and pop culture-related every day to an audience of more than seven million readers a month. They've appeared three times on Sundance Channel's All on the Line, with Joe Zee, in which Joe called them "two of the most important fashion bloggers today," made a dozen-plus appearances on Sirius XM Radio's "The Derek & Romaine Show," and have been profiled, quoted or interviewed by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, the Los Angeles Times, National Public Radio, Entertainment Weekly, People, Vanity Fair, Elle, Rolling Stone, the Daily Telegraph, The Huffington Post, Slate, The Guardian, and Newsweek, among others. They live in Philadelphia.

Excerpt

Introduction

This book is meant to be read one-handed.

No, you didn’t accidentally pick up the wrong book or get a defective copy with the wrong cover on

it. What we mean is that this book was devised, from its inception, to spur the reader on to look up more about the people highlighted and spotlighted in it. We want you to become so curious about what Julian Eltinge looked like or how Charles Pierce sounded or whether we’re doing Tandi Iman Dupree jus- tice when we describe her legendary lip sync that you can’t help but want to see it for yourself. We want you to grab your phone and look up a video or blog post or wiki entry about any of the people or events mentioned in this book whenever the curiosity strikes you. There is an Alexandria-size library of spectacular queer history and cultural essays literally at your fingertips, and this book was written not only with that in mind but in a way that encourages you to look someone up because you read about them in these pages. Practically every performer mentioned in this book has some aspect of their work preserved online, which means you can look up Jackie Shane singing “Walking the Dog” on Canadian television in 1965 or Sylvia Rivera’s legendary speech at the Christopher Street parade in 1973 as easily as you can look up Manila Luzon’s latest music video.

RuPaul’s Drag Race started out as the purest representation of gay male social culture that television had ever seen, and eventually morphed into a celebration of LGBTQ life and culture in general, encompassing all the work and lives of count- less queer people who came before it. Every aspect and feature of the show can be traced to some long-standing tradition, event, or practice in queer life, queer communities, and queer culture. RuPaul and company devised a show that serves as an actual museum of queer cultural and social history, drawing on queer traditions and the work of legendary figures going back nearly a century. In doing so, Drag Race became not only a repository of queer history and culture but an examination and illustration of queer life in the modern age. It is a series of snap- shots illustrating how LGBTQ folks live, struggle, work, and reach out to each other—and how they always have.

The point of this book isn’t to reveal all the secrets and hidden meanings behind Drag Race—the show isn’t that deliberate in its intentions; and besides, that’s not how culture works. The point is to show that Drag Race exists smack on the continuum of queer culture and history and naturally pulls references from up and down its timeline, sometimes deliberately and sometimes as a result of a cultural osmosis.

The history of the show itself is something of a queer Cinderella story, a nearly perfect metaphor for drag: A dirty little smeared-lens, poorly lit, low-def, rough-looking drag revue sandwiched between HIV meds and leather gear ads on an extremely niche cable network went on to become a worldwide glamour extravaganza. The journey of the show perfectly mimics the journey of drag as an underground form of expression that eventually found its way to the highest arenas of media and entertainment. The first season of Drag Race looks like it was shot in the dimly lit back room of a bar somewhere, but by the tenth season, it looked exactly like what it was at that point: a massive hit variety show loaded with sparkle and glamour, populated by impossibly beautiful beings with sickeningly flawless makeup. We’re going to show how queer culture generally and drag culture specifically made a very similar journey. When we say “queer culture,” that’s not necessarily the same thing as queer equality or legal protections, nor does it encompass the broad spectrum of queer existence. It’s the shared culture created or curated by queer people for queer people arising out of our experiences as queer people.

The story of RuPaul’s Drag Race is the same as the story of the LGBTQ political and cultural movement of the past half century; it’s impossible to separate one from the other. You can’t talk about RuPaul’s Drag Race in any depth without talking a bit about the history of drag as a form of expression and a part of pop culture. And you can’t talk about drag as a form of expression without talking about its place in queer life. And you can’t talk about queer life over time without having some idea of what LGBTQ folks faced in the past and how their lives played out.

For the majority of the twentieth century, it was illegal for a man to appear in public wearing women’s clothing. It was illegal for men to have sex with other men, and the mere act of flirting could land a man in jail or a mental institution, or have him medicated against his will (a practice known as “chemical castration”). It was illegal to produce or distribute any work that depicted same-sex desires, and it was illegal for bars and restaurants to serve alcohol to gay or lesbian patrons. Same-sex desire and gender nonconformity were considered mental illnesses by the American Psychiatric Association and the majority of the medical community. It’s important to know these things in order to understand just how brave and fuck-you fierce our queer forebears actually were. They didn’t just declare them- selves in the face of societal disapproval; they did so in the face of attempted social genocide. And they just kept on going, surviving and then thriving, creating art, communities, and families— and redefining all three in the process. These people were criminals and outlaws, punks and badass bitches. Maybe they didn’t always feel like it at the time, but they were revolutionaries. More important, they won the revolution. It just took some time for everyone else to notice.

But we would never want to claim that those queens and queers of the past lived lives of misery or tragedy. We think a good deal of our LGBTQ forebears would have summed up their lives as ones filled to the brim with a kind of ragingly defiant beauty—gorgeous weeds breaking fabulously through the cracks in the pavement. We choose to see them that way because we feel it pays tribute to their struggles without depicting them as tragic. They were too beautiful, too strong, too brave for us to see them any other way. We hope we’ve done them justice, and we hope you see them the same way by the time you’ve read all their stories. They were, every one of them, without question, legends.

Now, put your face on. We’ve got a show to do.

Praise

“As a longtime, devoted reader and admirer of Tom and Lorenzo's writing, I couldn't be more thrilled to have such a detailed, comprehensive analysis of the best reality television show ever made on Planet Earth (RuPaul's Drag Race). I adore Legendary Children, not just because I am in it, but for its thoroughly entertaining catalogue of television, drag and queer history.”
—Katya Zamolodchikova, co-author of Trixie and Katya’s Guide to Modern Womanhood

“Using Drag Race's prominence as a mirror to reflect drag brilliance through the ages, this must-read book articulately celebrates the icons—both well-known and under-appreciated—who made magic with a mascara wand and whose finely glossed lips were always worth reading. Like this book!”
—Michael Musto 

“Informative, entertaining, melodramatic in its obsessiveness, and written with equal amounts of insight and wit, the book serves as a commemorative archive of drag in American life.”
Kirkus

“It's officially been a decade since RuPaul's Drag Race aired its first season, and a groundbreaking queer phenomenon was born. In celebration of this milestone, Tom Fitzgerald and Lorenzo Marquez wrote Legendary Children, which explores queer history and culture and talks about how RuPaul's hit reality show contributed to this rich tradition.”
Cosmopolitan

“Part loving homage to the show, part history lesson, think of it as the queer education you didn't get in public school.”
Evan Ross Katz, Paper

Legendary Children arrives at just the right time — both because season 12 of 'Drag Race' just premiered and because the world needs authenticity in its stories. Fitzgerald and Marquez deliver that, giving readers an insight into the important but overlooked people who made our current moment possible.”
—Ryan Carey-Mahoney, The Washington Post

“[Legendary Children] turn[s] ‘Drag Race’s’ challenges and recurring elements (the Pit Crew, Snatch Game, etc.) into a deceptively simple framing device for a nuanced exploration of the gender-bending figures, insider lingo and significant milestones in queer history to which the show owes its existence…For a book about reality television, Legendary Children is unusually ambitious — an obsessively detailed portrait of modern LGBTQ life and how it came to be.”
—Katie Wudel, The Los Angeles Times


“It’s a delightful and important look at the way past queens and other queer folk have shaped not only drag but also queer life as we know it. Fitzgerald and Marquez have crafted a world in which drag queens are heroes - fighting for equality and looking fierce and fabulous while doing it. It’s a history well told, one that is approachable and enjoyable for all to digest. The prose is upbeat and makes a reader as excited about the history as the authors so clearly are.”
—Molly Sprayregen, Associated Press

“The sharp, smart playfulness…encapsulates the tremendous appeal of Legendary Children: great seriousness of purpose set off by a mischievous, even lascivious wink. Using Drag Race as a framework to explore many, many corners of LGBTQ+ life is something of a stroke of genius, making this an excellent piece of TV criticism as well as an exploration of history.”
—Allison Shoemaker, AV Club

“The book seamlessly weaves LGBTQ history into the 'Drag Race' present, and gives readers a deep dive into the background of the show’s challenges, and what they mean in the history of queer life.”
—Carole Horst, Variety

RuPaul’s Drag Race fans will salivate over this definitive deep-dive and ultimate guide to all-things Drag Race and how the hit show has influenced modern LGBTQ culture.”
—Queerty

“Legendary bloggers Tom and Lorenzo trace the last century of queer revolutionary activity through the art of drag. The history of acceptance of queer people has waxed and waned, and they guide us through the big cultural moments that allowed greater visibility and took rights away at the same time.”
—Julia Rittenberg,
Book Riot

“This book cleverly weaves aspects of RuPaul’s Drag Race – lip syncing, the Snatch Game, serving lewks – with the queer cultural history behind the show. In the introduction, Tom Fitzgerald and Lorenzo Marquez style bloggers Tom + Lorenzo, encourage readers to Google as they go, diving into Internet rabbit holes on various aspects of queer culture outlined in the book. Reading this book led me to discover a treasure trove of YouTube videos, documentaries and Wikipedia pages that I never would have found on my own.”
Jessica Reedy, producer, Pop Culture Happy Hour

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