Jane Austen's witty comedy of manners is one of the most universally loved and admired English novels of all time.

“It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.”

The Bennets are a family of five daughters, and with no male heir, the Bennet estate must someday pass to their priggish cousin Mr. Collins. Therefore, with no fortune or security of their own, the girls must marry well—and thus is launched the story of spirited and opinionated Elizabeth Bennet and the arrogant and aloof bachelor Mr. Darcy.  

An entertaining portrait of nineteenth century matrimonial rites and rivalries, Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice is timeless in its hilarity and honesty. As Elizabeth and Darcy’s first impressions lead to civilized sparring and ultimately true and enduring love, it becomes clear why this masterwork renowned for its romance and wit.

With an Introduction by Margaret Drabble
and an Afterword by Eloisa James
Though the domain of Jane Austen’s novels was as circumscribed as her life, her caustic wit and keen observation made her the equal of the greatest novelists in any language. Born the seventh child of the rector of Steventon, Hampshire, on December 16, 1775, she was educated mainly at home. At an early age she began writing sketches and satires of popular novels for her family’s entertainment. As a clergyman’s daughter from a well-connected family, she had ample opportunity to study the habits of the middle class, the gentry, and the aristocracy. At 21, she began a novel called “The First Impressions,” an early version of Pride and Prejudice. In 1801, on her father’s retirement, the family moved to the fashionable resort of Bath. Two years later she sold the first version of Northanger Abby to a London publisher, but the first of her novels to appear in print was Sense and Sensibility, published at her own expense in 1811. It was followed by Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1815). After her father died in 1805, the family first moved to Southampton then to Chawton Cottage in Hampshire. Despite this relative retirement, Jane Austen was still in touch with a wider world, mainly through her brothers; one had become a very rich country gentleman, another a London banker, and two were naval officers. Though her many novels were published anonymously, she had many early and devoted readers, among them the Prince Regent and Sir Walter Scott. In 1816, in declining health, Austen wrote Persuasion and revised Northanger Abby. Her last work, Sandition, was left unfinished at her death on July 18, 1817. She was buried in Winchester Cathedral. Austen’s identity as an author was announced to the world posthumously by her brother Henry, who supervised the publication of Northanger Abby and Persuasion in 1818. View titles by Jane Austen
Educator Guide for Pride and Prejudice

Classroom-based guides appropriate for schools and colleges provide pre-reading and classroom activities, discussion questions connected to the curriculum, further reading, and resources.

(Please note: the guide displayed here is the most recently uploaded version; while unlikely, any page citation discrepancies between the guide and book is likely due to pagination differences between a book’s different formats.)

“[Austen] had a talent for describing the involvements and feelings and characters of ordinary life which is…the most wonderful I ever met.”—Sir Walter Scott 

About

Jane Austen's witty comedy of manners is one of the most universally loved and admired English novels of all time.

“It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune must be in want of a wife.”

The Bennets are a family of five daughters, and with no male heir, the Bennet estate must someday pass to their priggish cousin Mr. Collins. Therefore, with no fortune or security of their own, the girls must marry well—and thus is launched the story of spirited and opinionated Elizabeth Bennet and the arrogant and aloof bachelor Mr. Darcy.  

An entertaining portrait of nineteenth century matrimonial rites and rivalries, Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice is timeless in its hilarity and honesty. As Elizabeth and Darcy’s first impressions lead to civilized sparring and ultimately true and enduring love, it becomes clear why this masterwork renowned for its romance and wit.

With an Introduction by Margaret Drabble
and an Afterword by Eloisa James

Author

Though the domain of Jane Austen’s novels was as circumscribed as her life, her caustic wit and keen observation made her the equal of the greatest novelists in any language. Born the seventh child of the rector of Steventon, Hampshire, on December 16, 1775, she was educated mainly at home. At an early age she began writing sketches and satires of popular novels for her family’s entertainment. As a clergyman’s daughter from a well-connected family, she had ample opportunity to study the habits of the middle class, the gentry, and the aristocracy. At 21, she began a novel called “The First Impressions,” an early version of Pride and Prejudice. In 1801, on her father’s retirement, the family moved to the fashionable resort of Bath. Two years later she sold the first version of Northanger Abby to a London publisher, but the first of her novels to appear in print was Sense and Sensibility, published at her own expense in 1811. It was followed by Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1815). After her father died in 1805, the family first moved to Southampton then to Chawton Cottage in Hampshire. Despite this relative retirement, Jane Austen was still in touch with a wider world, mainly through her brothers; one had become a very rich country gentleman, another a London banker, and two were naval officers. Though her many novels were published anonymously, she had many early and devoted readers, among them the Prince Regent and Sir Walter Scott. In 1816, in declining health, Austen wrote Persuasion and revised Northanger Abby. Her last work, Sandition, was left unfinished at her death on July 18, 1817. She was buried in Winchester Cathedral. Austen’s identity as an author was announced to the world posthumously by her brother Henry, who supervised the publication of Northanger Abby and Persuasion in 1818. View titles by Jane Austen

Guides

Educator Guide for Pride and Prejudice

Classroom-based guides appropriate for schools and colleges provide pre-reading and classroom activities, discussion questions connected to the curriculum, further reading, and resources.

(Please note: the guide displayed here is the most recently uploaded version; while unlikely, any page citation discrepancies between the guide and book is likely due to pagination differences between a book’s different formats.)

Praise

“[Austen] had a talent for describing the involvements and feelings and characters of ordinary life which is…the most wonderful I ever met.”—Sir Walter Scott 

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