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In a Glass Grimmly

Illustrated by Hugh D'Andrade
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From the Newbery Honor-winning, New York Times bestselling author of The Inquisitor's Tale.

If you dare, join Jack and Jill as they embark on a harrowing quest through a new set of tales from the Brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen, and others. Follow along as they enter startling new landscapes that may (or may not) be scary, bloody, terrifying, and altogether true in this hair-raising companion to Adam Gidwitz’s widely acclaimed, award-winning debut, A Tale Dark & Grimm.
 
An Oprah Kids’ Reading List Pick
A Publishers Weekly Best New Book of the Week Pick
 
For more twisted tales look for A Tale Dark & Grimm and The Grimm Conclusion
© Lauren Mancia
Bestselling author Adam Gidwitz was a teacher for eight years. He told countless stories to his students, who then demanded he write his first book, A Tale Dark & Grimm. Adam has since written two companion novels, In a Glass Grimmly and The Grimm Conclusion. He is also the author of The Inquisitor’s Tale, which won the Newbery Honor, and The Unicorn Rescue Society series. Adam still tells creepy, funny fairy tales live to kids on his podcast Grimm, Grimmer, Grimmest—and at schools around the world. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife, daughter, and dog, Lucy Goosey. View titles by Adam Gidwitz
Fairy tales were, in a word, horrible.

Two hundred years ago, in Germany, the Brothers Grimm first wrote down that version of Cinderella in which the stepsisters slice off pieces of their feet and get their eyes pecked out. In England, a man names Joseph Jacobs collected tales like Jack the Giant Killer, which is about a boy named Jack who goes around murdering giants in the most gruesome and grotesque ways imaginable. And there was this guy called Hans Christian Andersen, who lived in Denmark and wrote fairy tales filled with sadness and humiliation and loneliness. Even Mother Goose’s rhymes could get pretty dark—after all, Jack and Jill go up a hill, and then Jack falls down and breaks his head open.

Yes, fairy tales were horrible. In the original sense of the word.

But even these horrible fairy tales and nursery rhymes aren’t true. They’re just stories. Right?

Not exactly.
Accolades for A Tale Dark & Grimm:
New York Times bestseller
• Selection on the Today Show’s Al’s Book Club for Kids
• NCTE Notable Children’s Books in the Language Arts Selection
• An E. B. White Read Aloud Honor Book
New York Times Editors’ Choice pick
Publishers Weekly Flying Start
School Library Journal Best Book of the Year
• ALA Notable Book
 
“Unlike any children’s book I’ve ever read . . . [it] holds up to multiple re-readings, like the classic I think it will turn out to be.”—New York Times Book Review
“A marvelous reworking of old stories that manages to be fresh, frightening, funny, and humane.”—Wall Street Journal

Accolades for In a Glass Grimmly:
New York Times bestseller
• A Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2012
• A Kirkus Reviews Best Book of 2012
• A School Librry Journal Best Book of 2012
 
 “Gidwitz is back with a second book that, if possible, outshines A Tale Dark & Grimm.”—School Library Journal, starred review
 
 “Compulsively readable.”—Kirkus Reviews, starred review
 
“Gory, hilarious, touching, and lyrical all at once, with tons of kid appeal.”—The Horn Book
 
“Adam Gidwitz leads us into creepy forests, gruesome deeds, terrible monsters, and—far worse—the dark places of the human heart. It’s horrible . . . and I LOVED it!”—Tom Angleberger, author of The Strange Case of Origami 

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About

From the Newbery Honor-winning, New York Times bestselling author of The Inquisitor's Tale.

If you dare, join Jack and Jill as they embark on a harrowing quest through a new set of tales from the Brothers Grimm, Hans Christian Andersen, and others. Follow along as they enter startling new landscapes that may (or may not) be scary, bloody, terrifying, and altogether true in this hair-raising companion to Adam Gidwitz’s widely acclaimed, award-winning debut, A Tale Dark & Grimm.
 
An Oprah Kids’ Reading List Pick
A Publishers Weekly Best New Book of the Week Pick
 
For more twisted tales look for A Tale Dark & Grimm and The Grimm Conclusion

Author

© Lauren Mancia
Bestselling author Adam Gidwitz was a teacher for eight years. He told countless stories to his students, who then demanded he write his first book, A Tale Dark & Grimm. Adam has since written two companion novels, In a Glass Grimmly and The Grimm Conclusion. He is also the author of The Inquisitor’s Tale, which won the Newbery Honor, and The Unicorn Rescue Society series. Adam still tells creepy, funny fairy tales live to kids on his podcast Grimm, Grimmer, Grimmest—and at schools around the world. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife, daughter, and dog, Lucy Goosey. View titles by Adam Gidwitz

Excerpt

Fairy tales were, in a word, horrible.

Two hundred years ago, in Germany, the Brothers Grimm first wrote down that version of Cinderella in which the stepsisters slice off pieces of their feet and get their eyes pecked out. In England, a man names Joseph Jacobs collected tales like Jack the Giant Killer, which is about a boy named Jack who goes around murdering giants in the most gruesome and grotesque ways imaginable. And there was this guy called Hans Christian Andersen, who lived in Denmark and wrote fairy tales filled with sadness and humiliation and loneliness. Even Mother Goose’s rhymes could get pretty dark—after all, Jack and Jill go up a hill, and then Jack falls down and breaks his head open.

Yes, fairy tales were horrible. In the original sense of the word.

But even these horrible fairy tales and nursery rhymes aren’t true. They’re just stories. Right?

Not exactly.

Praise

Accolades for A Tale Dark & Grimm:
New York Times bestseller
• Selection on the Today Show’s Al’s Book Club for Kids
• NCTE Notable Children’s Books in the Language Arts Selection
• An E. B. White Read Aloud Honor Book
New York Times Editors’ Choice pick
Publishers Weekly Flying Start
School Library Journal Best Book of the Year
• ALA Notable Book
 
“Unlike any children’s book I’ve ever read . . . [it] holds up to multiple re-readings, like the classic I think it will turn out to be.”—New York Times Book Review
“A marvelous reworking of old stories that manages to be fresh, frightening, funny, and humane.”—Wall Street Journal

Accolades for In a Glass Grimmly:
New York Times bestseller
• A Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2012
• A Kirkus Reviews Best Book of 2012
• A School Librry Journal Best Book of 2012
 
 “Gidwitz is back with a second book that, if possible, outshines A Tale Dark & Grimm.”—School Library Journal, starred review
 
 “Compulsively readable.”—Kirkus Reviews, starred review
 
“Gory, hilarious, touching, and lyrical all at once, with tons of kid appeal.”—The Horn Book
 
“Adam Gidwitz leads us into creepy forests, gruesome deeds, terrible monsters, and—far worse—the dark places of the human heart. It’s horrible . . . and I LOVED it!”—Tom Angleberger, author of The Strange Case of Origami 

Media

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