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Who Was Blackbeard?

Part of Who Was?

Illustrated by Joseph J. M. Qiu
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Paperback
$6.99 US
5.31"W x 7.62"H x 0.24"D  
On sale Nov 10, 2015 | 112 Pages | 9780448483085
| Grades 3-7
Reading Level: Lexile 950L | Fountas & Pinnell W
Though much of his early life remains a mystery, Blackbeard most likely began his life as Edward Teach in the sailing port of Bristol, England. He began his career as a hired British sailor during Queen Anne’s War. He eventually settled in the Bahamas under Captain Benjamin Hornigold who taught the young sailor to go "a-pirating." Soon enough, Blackbeard was commanding his own fleet and stealing ships around the Caribbean and up and down the Eastern seaboard. Known for his thick, black beard and fearsome reputation, the legend of Blackbeard has influenced pirate legend and lore for over 300 years.
James Buckley Jr. is a prolific author of nonfiction for young readers, with more than 150 books to his credit (and still typing!). He is the author of more than a dozen titles in the New York Times bestselling Who Was? biography series, including books on the Wright Brothers, Milton Hershey, Betsy Ross, Jules Verne, and Blackbeard. View titles by James Buckley, Jr.
Who HQ is your headquarters for history. The Who HQ team is always working to provide simple and clear answers to some of our biggest questions. From Who Was George Washington? to Who Is Michelle Obama?, and What Was the Battle of Gettysburg? to Where Is the Great Barrier Reef?, we strive to give you all the facts. Visit us at WhoHQ.com View titles by Who HQ
Who Was Blackbeard?
 
By 1717, Philadelphia was one of the largest cities in the American colonies, which were owned by Great Britain. Philadelphia was on the Delaware River, and its port welcomed ships from Europe almost every day. But in the fall of that year, many of those ships never made it to port. The few that did told tales that shocked and frightened the English colonists in and around Philadelphia. A pirate ship was lurking nearby in the Atlantic Ocean, where the Delaware met the sea.
 
Captains arriving in New York City and Baltimore told the same stories. A pirate was attacking their ships. He swooped in with his black flag flying. His men stormed merchant ships and stole everything that wasn’t nailed down.
 
The pirate captain himself had a long black beard and wore belts rigged with pistols and
swords. He wore lit pieces or rope in his beard so that his face was ringed by smoke. His vessel was equipped with cannons that sent iron balls smashing into the fragile sides of wooden ships. Only a brave few would dare to challenge him and his ferocious crew.
 
“If speedy care be not taken they will become formidable. . . . Our government can make no defense,” wrote Philadelphia merchant James Logan. Captain Charles Johnson later wrote that the pirate had “frightened America more than any comet that has appeared in a long time.”
 
This pirate was causing panic and fear throughout the American colonies. He continued his raids of terror down the Atlantic coast and into the Caribbean Sea. The people that he robbed and captured didn’t know it at the time, but they were in the hands of the man who would become the most famous pirate ever: Blackbeard!

About

Though much of his early life remains a mystery, Blackbeard most likely began his life as Edward Teach in the sailing port of Bristol, England. He began his career as a hired British sailor during Queen Anne’s War. He eventually settled in the Bahamas under Captain Benjamin Hornigold who taught the young sailor to go "a-pirating." Soon enough, Blackbeard was commanding his own fleet and stealing ships around the Caribbean and up and down the Eastern seaboard. Known for his thick, black beard and fearsome reputation, the legend of Blackbeard has influenced pirate legend and lore for over 300 years.

Author

James Buckley Jr. is a prolific author of nonfiction for young readers, with more than 150 books to his credit (and still typing!). He is the author of more than a dozen titles in the New York Times bestselling Who Was? biography series, including books on the Wright Brothers, Milton Hershey, Betsy Ross, Jules Verne, and Blackbeard. View titles by James Buckley, Jr.
Who HQ is your headquarters for history. The Who HQ team is always working to provide simple and clear answers to some of our biggest questions. From Who Was George Washington? to Who Is Michelle Obama?, and What Was the Battle of Gettysburg? to Where Is the Great Barrier Reef?, we strive to give you all the facts. Visit us at WhoHQ.com View titles by Who HQ

Excerpt

Who Was Blackbeard?
 
By 1717, Philadelphia was one of the largest cities in the American colonies, which were owned by Great Britain. Philadelphia was on the Delaware River, and its port welcomed ships from Europe almost every day. But in the fall of that year, many of those ships never made it to port. The few that did told tales that shocked and frightened the English colonists in and around Philadelphia. A pirate ship was lurking nearby in the Atlantic Ocean, where the Delaware met the sea.
 
Captains arriving in New York City and Baltimore told the same stories. A pirate was attacking their ships. He swooped in with his black flag flying. His men stormed merchant ships and stole everything that wasn’t nailed down.
 
The pirate captain himself had a long black beard and wore belts rigged with pistols and
swords. He wore lit pieces or rope in his beard so that his face was ringed by smoke. His vessel was equipped with cannons that sent iron balls smashing into the fragile sides of wooden ships. Only a brave few would dare to challenge him and his ferocious crew.
 
“If speedy care be not taken they will become formidable. . . . Our government can make no defense,” wrote Philadelphia merchant James Logan. Captain Charles Johnson later wrote that the pirate had “frightened America more than any comet that has appeared in a long time.”
 
This pirate was causing panic and fear throughout the American colonies. He continued his raids of terror down the Atlantic coast and into the Caribbean Sea. The people that he robbed and captured didn’t know it at the time, but they were in the hands of the man who would become the most famous pirate ever: Blackbeard!

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