How to Be Drawn

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Paperback
$25.00 US
6.03"W x 8.97"H x 0.31"D  
On sale Mar 31, 2015 | 112 Pages | 978-0-14-312688-1
| Grades 9-12 + AP/IB
A finalist for the 2015 National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award

In How to Be Drawn, his daring fifth collection, Terrance Hayes explores how we see and are seen. While many of these poems bear the clearest imprint yet of Hayes’s background as a visual artist, they do not strive to describe art so much as inhabit it. Thus, one poem contemplates the principle of blind contour drawing while others are inspired by maps, graphs, and assorted artists. The formal and emotional versatilities that distinguish Hayes’s award-winning poetry are unified by existential focus. Simultaneously complex and transparent, urgent and composed, How to Be Drawn is a mesmerizing achievement.
Terrance Hayes is the author of American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin, winner of the 2019 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and Lighthead, winner of the 2010 National Book Award. His other poetry collections are So to Speak, How to Be Drawn, Wind in a Box, Hip Logic, and Muscular Music. He is also the author of To Float in the Space Between: A Life and Work in Conversation with the Life and Work of Etheridge Knight, winner of the 2019 Poetry Foundation Pegasus Award for Poetry Criticism. His honors include a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a 2014 MacArthur Fellowship. Hayes lives in New York City, where he is a professor of creative writing at New York University. View titles by Terrance Hayes

 

 

Praise for How to Be Drawn
 
“Hayes’s work fits strong emotions into virtuoso forms. . .He is a poet of swallowed garrulity, imagined riposte, mock correction, and interior litigation. . .[his] poems are like a Pixar version of the mental marionette show, a dazzling space crammed with comic jabs.”—Dan Chiasson, The New Yorker
                                                                         
“Music serves as both an animating force and resonant presence in Hayes’s poems. . .Hayes occupies this musical mode like a connoisseur and deploys it like a virtuoso.  His lines can (and do) freely drift between themes of blackness, masculinity, history, family, art, and language, and freely shift between forms.”—The Boston Globe
                                                                          
“One of the most exciting and imaginative poets at work in America today. . .though his writing, with its mix of intellectual agility and sonic density, sounds far more like hip hop, it stands, temperamentally, in the tradition of older kinds of music:  folk ballads, for example, or the blues, traditions that take hardship as a given and seek solace, entertainment, and communion in its midst.”—Slate
                                                                            
“Both a fascinating and liberating collection of poems. As it kicks against our staid definition of poetry it offers new and refreshing possibilities for the artform.”—The Pittsburgh Post Gazette

“Another stunner, a collection that sees the poet thinking more deeply about perception – the public and private, the viewed and the ignored. . .the work hurdles between violent beauty and stark, philosophical truth telling.”—Publishers Weekly
 
“Assured and electrifying. . .a grandly imaginative and cunningly inventive poet. . .Hayes writes far-reaching yet intimate monologues that are simultaneously subtle and hard-hitting. . .Expansive, original, resounding.”—ALA Booklist
 
“Reading Terrance Hayes’ thick, gorgeous, knowing, endlessly surprising poems is like spending a long evening with your most soulful and garrulous friend, one you haven’t seen in ages.  His poems are protean; you never know when they will shape-shift or turn a corner.  Hayes and his poems are brilliant, which is to say, bedazzling but also filled with illuminating light that shows us things we hadn’t seen before.”—Elizabeth Alexander

About

A finalist for the 2015 National Book Award and the National Book Critics Circle Award

In How to Be Drawn, his daring fifth collection, Terrance Hayes explores how we see and are seen. While many of these poems bear the clearest imprint yet of Hayes’s background as a visual artist, they do not strive to describe art so much as inhabit it. Thus, one poem contemplates the principle of blind contour drawing while others are inspired by maps, graphs, and assorted artists. The formal and emotional versatilities that distinguish Hayes’s award-winning poetry are unified by existential focus. Simultaneously complex and transparent, urgent and composed, How to Be Drawn is a mesmerizing achievement.

Author

Terrance Hayes is the author of American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin, winner of the 2019 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award, and Lighthead, winner of the 2010 National Book Award. His other poetry collections are So to Speak, How to Be Drawn, Wind in a Box, Hip Logic, and Muscular Music. He is also the author of To Float in the Space Between: A Life and Work in Conversation with the Life and Work of Etheridge Knight, winner of the 2019 Poetry Foundation Pegasus Award for Poetry Criticism. His honors include a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a 2014 MacArthur Fellowship. Hayes lives in New York City, where he is a professor of creative writing at New York University. View titles by Terrance Hayes

Excerpt

 

 

Praise

Praise for How to Be Drawn
 
“Hayes’s work fits strong emotions into virtuoso forms. . .He is a poet of swallowed garrulity, imagined riposte, mock correction, and interior litigation. . .[his] poems are like a Pixar version of the mental marionette show, a dazzling space crammed with comic jabs.”—Dan Chiasson, The New Yorker
                                                                         
“Music serves as both an animating force and resonant presence in Hayes’s poems. . .Hayes occupies this musical mode like a connoisseur and deploys it like a virtuoso.  His lines can (and do) freely drift between themes of blackness, masculinity, history, family, art, and language, and freely shift between forms.”—The Boston Globe
                                                                          
“One of the most exciting and imaginative poets at work in America today. . .though his writing, with its mix of intellectual agility and sonic density, sounds far more like hip hop, it stands, temperamentally, in the tradition of older kinds of music:  folk ballads, for example, or the blues, traditions that take hardship as a given and seek solace, entertainment, and communion in its midst.”—Slate
                                                                            
“Both a fascinating and liberating collection of poems. As it kicks against our staid definition of poetry it offers new and refreshing possibilities for the artform.”—The Pittsburgh Post Gazette

“Another stunner, a collection that sees the poet thinking more deeply about perception – the public and private, the viewed and the ignored. . .the work hurdles between violent beauty and stark, philosophical truth telling.”—Publishers Weekly
 
“Assured and electrifying. . .a grandly imaginative and cunningly inventive poet. . .Hayes writes far-reaching yet intimate monologues that are simultaneously subtle and hard-hitting. . .Expansive, original, resounding.”—ALA Booklist
 
“Reading Terrance Hayes’ thick, gorgeous, knowing, endlessly surprising poems is like spending a long evening with your most soulful and garrulous friend, one you haven’t seen in ages.  His poems are protean; you never know when they will shape-shift or turn a corner.  Hayes and his poems are brilliant, which is to say, bedazzling but also filled with illuminating light that shows us things we hadn’t seen before.”—Elizabeth Alexander

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