Women's Indian Captivity Narratives

Author Various
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Paperback
$24.00 US
5.1"W x 7.7"H x 0.85"D  
On sale Nov 01, 1998 | 400 Pages | 978-0-14-043671-6
| Grades 9-12 + AP/IB
Enthralling generations of readers, the narrative of capture by Native Americans is arguably the first American literary form dominated by the experiences of women. The ten selections in this anthology span the early history of this country (1682-1892) and range in literary style from fact-based narrations to largely fictional, spellbinding adventure stories. The women are variously victimized, triumphant, or, in the case of Mary Jemison, permantently transculturated. This collection includes well known pieces such as Mary Rowlandson's "A True History" (1682), Cotton Mather's version of Hannah Dunstan's infamous captivity and escape (after scalping her captors!), and the "Panther Captivity", as well as lesser known texts. As Derounian-Stodola demonstrates in the introduction, the stories also raise questions about the motives of their (often male) narrators and promoters, who in many cases embellish melodrama to heighten anti-British and anti-Indian propaganda, shape the tales for ecclesiastical purposes, or romanticize them to exploit the growing popularity of sentimental fiction in order to boost sales.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.
ALEXANDER MACLEOD was born in Inverness, Cape Breton and raised in Windsor, Ontario. His first collection of stories, Light Lifting, was a national bestseller, won an Atlantic Book Award, and was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, the Thomas Head Raddall Fiction Award, and the Commonwealth Book Prize. His most recent book of fiction, Animal Person, won the Dartmouth Book Award for Fiction, was named a Best Book of the Year by The New Yorker, CBC Books, and the Globe and Mail, and includes stories that were featured in The New Yorker, Granta, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. In 2019, he won an O. Henry Award for his story “Lagomorph.” MacLeod holds degrees from the University of Windsor, the University of Notre Dame, and McGill University. He currently lives in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, and teaches at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax.

SOUVANKHAM THAMMAVONGSA's fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, Harper's, Granta, The Atlantic, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Best American Non-Required Reading, The Journey Prize Stories, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Her debut book of fiction, How to Pronounce Knife, won the 2020 Scotiabank Giller Prize and the 2021 Trillium Book Award, and was named a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN America Open Book Award, the Danuta Gleed Award, and one of Time's Must-Read Books of 2020. Thammavongsa is also the author of four poetry books: Light, winner of the Trillium Book Award for Poetry; Found; Small Arguments, winner of the ReLit Award; and, most recently, Cluster. Born in the Lao refugee camp in Nong Khai, Thailand, she was raised and educated in Toronto, where she is at work on her first novel. View titles by Various
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
INTRODUCTION BY KATHRYN ZABELLE DEROUNIAN-STODOLA
SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING
A NOTE ON THE TEXTS

Mary Rowlandson:
A True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682)

Hannah Dustan:
A Notable Exploit; wherein, Dux Faemina Facti, from Magnalia Christi Americana by Cotton Mather (1702)

Elizabeth Hanson:
God's Mercy Surmounting Man's Cruelty, Exemplified in the Captivity and Redemption of Elizabeth Hanson (1728)

"Panther Captivity":
A Surprising Account of the Discovery of a Lady Who Was Taken by the Indians by Abraham Panther (1787)

Jemima Howe:
A Genuine and Correct Account of the Captivity, Sufferings and Deliverance of Mrs. Jemima Howe by Bunker Gay (1792)

Mary Kinnan:
A True Narrative of the Sufferings of Mary Kinnan by Shepard Kollock (1795)

Mary Jemison:
A Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison by James E. Seaver (1824)

Mary Godfrey:
An Authentic Narrative of the Seminole War, and of the Miraculous Escape of Mrs. Mary Godfrey, and Her Four Female Children (1836)

Sarah F. Wakefield:
Six Weeks in the Sioux Tepees: A Narrative of Indian Captivity (1864)

Emeline L. Fuller:
Left by the Indians. Story of My Life (1892)

EXPLANATORY NOTES

About

Enthralling generations of readers, the narrative of capture by Native Americans is arguably the first American literary form dominated by the experiences of women. The ten selections in this anthology span the early history of this country (1682-1892) and range in literary style from fact-based narrations to largely fictional, spellbinding adventure stories. The women are variously victimized, triumphant, or, in the case of Mary Jemison, permantently transculturated. This collection includes well known pieces such as Mary Rowlandson's "A True History" (1682), Cotton Mather's version of Hannah Dunstan's infamous captivity and escape (after scalping her captors!), and the "Panther Captivity", as well as lesser known texts. As Derounian-Stodola demonstrates in the introduction, the stories also raise questions about the motives of their (often male) narrators and promoters, who in many cases embellish melodrama to heighten anti-British and anti-Indian propaganda, shape the tales for ecclesiastical purposes, or romanticize them to exploit the growing popularity of sentimental fiction in order to boost sales.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Author

ALEXANDER MACLEOD was born in Inverness, Cape Breton and raised in Windsor, Ontario. His first collection of stories, Light Lifting, was a national bestseller, won an Atlantic Book Award, and was a finalist for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award, the Thomas Head Raddall Fiction Award, and the Commonwealth Book Prize. His most recent book of fiction, Animal Person, won the Dartmouth Book Award for Fiction, was named a Best Book of the Year by The New Yorker, CBC Books, and the Globe and Mail, and includes stories that were featured in The New Yorker, Granta, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. In 2019, he won an O. Henry Award for his story “Lagomorph.” MacLeod holds degrees from the University of Windsor, the University of Notre Dame, and McGill University. He currently lives in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, and teaches at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax.

SOUVANKHAM THAMMAVONGSA's fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, Harper's, Granta, The Atlantic, The Paris Review, Ploughshares, Best American Non-Required Reading, The Journey Prize Stories, and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Her debut book of fiction, How to Pronounce Knife, won the 2020 Scotiabank Giller Prize and the 2021 Trillium Book Award, and was named a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN America Open Book Award, the Danuta Gleed Award, and one of Time's Must-Read Books of 2020. Thammavongsa is also the author of four poetry books: Light, winner of the Trillium Book Award for Poetry; Found; Small Arguments, winner of the ReLit Award; and, most recently, Cluster. Born in the Lao refugee camp in Nong Khai, Thailand, she was raised and educated in Toronto, where she is at work on her first novel. View titles by Various

Table of Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
INTRODUCTION BY KATHRYN ZABELLE DEROUNIAN-STODOLA
SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER READING
A NOTE ON THE TEXTS

Mary Rowlandson:
A True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (1682)

Hannah Dustan:
A Notable Exploit; wherein, Dux Faemina Facti, from Magnalia Christi Americana by Cotton Mather (1702)

Elizabeth Hanson:
God's Mercy Surmounting Man's Cruelty, Exemplified in the Captivity and Redemption of Elizabeth Hanson (1728)

"Panther Captivity":
A Surprising Account of the Discovery of a Lady Who Was Taken by the Indians by Abraham Panther (1787)

Jemima Howe:
A Genuine and Correct Account of the Captivity, Sufferings and Deliverance of Mrs. Jemima Howe by Bunker Gay (1792)

Mary Kinnan:
A True Narrative of the Sufferings of Mary Kinnan by Shepard Kollock (1795)

Mary Jemison:
A Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Mary Jemison by James E. Seaver (1824)

Mary Godfrey:
An Authentic Narrative of the Seminole War, and of the Miraculous Escape of Mrs. Mary Godfrey, and Her Four Female Children (1836)

Sarah F. Wakefield:
Six Weeks in the Sioux Tepees: A Narrative of Indian Captivity (1864)

Emeline L. Fuller:
Left by the Indians. Story of My Life (1892)

EXPLANATORY NOTES

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