New Hampshire

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Paperback
$12.00 US
5.16"W x 7.96"H x 0.4"D  
On sale Jan 22, 2019 | 128 Pages | 978-0-525-56534-5
| Grades 6-12 + AP/IB
A Vintage Classics edition of Frost's 1923 collection of poems that won the Pulitzer Prize and contains some of his most famous and beloved poems. Includes the original woodcut illustrations, not in print elsewhere.

Robert Frost won the first of his four Pulitzer Prizes with this collection, published in 1923. It contains some of his most enduring and best-known poems, including “Nothing Gold Can Stay,” “Fire and Ice,” “The Need of Being Versed in Country Things,” and “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening.”

Included in this edition are the original woodcut illustrations of rural scenes, done in the Arts and Crafts style by J. J. Lankes.

Robert Frost was born in San Francisco in 1874. When he was ten, his father died and he and his mother moved to New England. He attended school at Dartmouth and Harvard, worked in a mill, taught, and took up farming, before he moved to England, where his first books of poetry, A Boy’s Will (1913) and North of Boston (1914), were published. North of Boston brought him recognition as the preeminent voice of New England and as one of America’s major poets. In 1915 he returned to the United States and settled on a farm in New Hampshire. Four volumes of his poetry, New Hampshire (1923), Collected Poems (1930), A Further Range (1936), and A Witness Tree (1942) were all awarded the Pulitzer Prize. He died in 1963.

View titles by Robert Frost
"Nothing Gold Can Stay"

Nature's first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf's a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay.


"Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening"

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though; 
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound's the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

About

A Vintage Classics edition of Frost's 1923 collection of poems that won the Pulitzer Prize and contains some of his most famous and beloved poems. Includes the original woodcut illustrations, not in print elsewhere.

Robert Frost won the first of his four Pulitzer Prizes with this collection, published in 1923. It contains some of his most enduring and best-known poems, including “Nothing Gold Can Stay,” “Fire and Ice,” “The Need of Being Versed in Country Things,” and “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening.”

Included in this edition are the original woodcut illustrations of rural scenes, done in the Arts and Crafts style by J. J. Lankes.

Author

Robert Frost was born in San Francisco in 1874. When he was ten, his father died and he and his mother moved to New England. He attended school at Dartmouth and Harvard, worked in a mill, taught, and took up farming, before he moved to England, where his first books of poetry, A Boy’s Will (1913) and North of Boston (1914), were published. North of Boston brought him recognition as the preeminent voice of New England and as one of America’s major poets. In 1915 he returned to the United States and settled on a farm in New Hampshire. Four volumes of his poetry, New Hampshire (1923), Collected Poems (1930), A Further Range (1936), and A Witness Tree (1942) were all awarded the Pulitzer Prize. He died in 1963.

View titles by Robert Frost

Excerpt

"Nothing Gold Can Stay"

Nature's first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf's a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay.


"Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening"

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though; 
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound's the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

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