Three Classic African-American Novels

Clotel, Iola Leary, The Marrow of Tradition

Introduction by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. On Tour
Edited by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. On Tour
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Paperback
$21.00 US
5.23"W x 7.98"H x 1.64"D  
On sale Aug 11, 1990 | 768 Pages | 978-0-679-72742-2
| Grades 9-12 + AP/IB
Originally published between 1853 and 1901, these three novels represent the beginnings of the black literary tradition in the United States. They have now been collected in one volume for the first time, edited and with and introduction by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Clotel, or The President's Daughter by William Wells Brown (1853). Written by an escaped slave, this novel is the gripping account of the ordeals of a mulatto woman purported to be the daughter of Thomas Jefferson.
Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted by Frances E.W. Harper (1892). In this pioneering work of the black woman's literary movement, a light-skinned black woman is raised as a free white, only to be tricked into slavery.
The Marrow of Tradition by Charles W. Chesnutt (1901). This suspenseful masterpiece tells of a sensitive African-American doctor facing the realities of segregation and racial terror in the Reconstructive South.
William Wells Brown (ca. 1814–1884) was an abolitionist and social reformer best remembered as the United States’ first black novelist and playwright, as well as one of the earliest African-American historians. After escaping from slavery on New Year’s Day in 1834, he went on to publish a bestselling memoir, a collection of antislavery songs, the novel Clotel, and many other highly regarded works. View titles by William W. Brown
Frances Ellen Watkins Harper is one of the true unsung heroes on the 19th century. Harper was an African American abolitionist, suffragist, poet, and author. A principal member of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Harper was a chief leader in petitioning  the federal government into taking a greater role in progressive reform. Some of her titles include Trial and Triumph; Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted; and Sowing and Reaping. Harper was born in 1825 and died in 1911.  View titles by Frances Ellen Watkins Harper
Charles Chesnutt (1858–1932) was born in Cleveland, Ohio. He drew on his experiences as a biracial American to address racial passing in his classic novel The House Behind the Cedars. Earning a living as a court stenographer and lawyer, Chesnutt supported a writing career that included the publication of numerous short stories and the completion of several other novels, some of which were considered too incendiary to be printed during his time. An active integrationist and civil rights leader, he was awarded a medal by the NAACP for distinguished literary contributions. View titles by Charles Chesnutt

About

Originally published between 1853 and 1901, these three novels represent the beginnings of the black literary tradition in the United States. They have now been collected in one volume for the first time, edited and with and introduction by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Clotel, or The President's Daughter by William Wells Brown (1853). Written by an escaped slave, this novel is the gripping account of the ordeals of a mulatto woman purported to be the daughter of Thomas Jefferson.
Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted by Frances E.W. Harper (1892). In this pioneering work of the black woman's literary movement, a light-skinned black woman is raised as a free white, only to be tricked into slavery.
The Marrow of Tradition by Charles W. Chesnutt (1901). This suspenseful masterpiece tells of a sensitive African-American doctor facing the realities of segregation and racial terror in the Reconstructive South.

Author

William Wells Brown (ca. 1814–1884) was an abolitionist and social reformer best remembered as the United States’ first black novelist and playwright, as well as one of the earliest African-American historians. After escaping from slavery on New Year’s Day in 1834, he went on to publish a bestselling memoir, a collection of antislavery songs, the novel Clotel, and many other highly regarded works. View titles by William W. Brown
Frances Ellen Watkins Harper is one of the true unsung heroes on the 19th century. Harper was an African American abolitionist, suffragist, poet, and author. A principal member of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Harper was a chief leader in petitioning  the federal government into taking a greater role in progressive reform. Some of her titles include Trial and Triumph; Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted; and Sowing and Reaping. Harper was born in 1825 and died in 1911.  View titles by Frances Ellen Watkins Harper
Charles Chesnutt (1858–1932) was born in Cleveland, Ohio. He drew on his experiences as a biracial American to address racial passing in his classic novel The House Behind the Cedars. Earning a living as a court stenographer and lawyer, Chesnutt supported a writing career that included the publication of numerous short stories and the completion of several other novels, some of which were considered too incendiary to be printed during his time. An active integrationist and civil rights leader, he was awarded a medal by the NAACP for distinguished literary contributions. View titles by Charles Chesnutt

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